It’s the Glasgow Fair!

‘for most of us, holidays overseas have been put ‘on hold’ this year’

In Glasgow the last two weeks in July have been traditionally known as ‘the Glasgow Fair fortnight.’ In the past shipyards, engineering works, factories and businesses all over the city closed for the annual holiday, with only a few ‘skeleton staff’ being kept on to deal with any urgent phone calls or business. It was ‘lockdown time’ while the populace at large went off on holiday, mostly to venues along the Firth of Clyde coast. That tradition has changed over the last thirty years with the introduction of the ‘package holiday.’ Holidays at Rothesay on the Isle of Bute, have given way to venues in Spain and around Europe, where people fly off in search of sun and adventure. And so holiday times now have become much more flexible.

But for most of us, holidays overseas have been put ‘on hold’ this year, so many are returning to nearer home destinations. For us, the ‘Glasgow fair’ holds many memories of happy holidays all around Scotland, and in fact my wife and I met at a Christian Youth Camp (CYC) during ‘the Fair’, and we got engaged to be married on ‘Fair Monday’!

So this past weekend we celebrated with a couple of special day trips, to some of our old haunts on the Clyde Coast. Our first trip was on Saturday, when we visited Cove, a little village on the edge of Loch Long, just where it reaches the Clyde estuary. We drove from Glasgow, crossed the river Clyde at the Erskine bridge, and down through Dumbarton and Helensburgh to Gareloch (home to the UK’s nuclear submarine base). Then we turned along the southside of Gareloch and over the hill to Cove. About and hour and fifteen minutes from Glasgow depending on road conditions. It was a warm day with a fresh breeze and intermittent showers. You never tire of the beauty of the Scottish scenery and when we reached Cove the place was, …. quiet! We came home via Glen Fruin and Loch Lomond.

‘Fair Monday’ was another showery day, but armed with the proverbial picnic lunch we headed in the other direction, keeping on the southside of the Clyde Estuary and headed for the small village of Dunure. The council there had recently upgraded the toilet block and park entrance, but had not bargained for the onset of the Corona virus! Park entrance fee and entrance to the toilets called for cash, with no facility for paying by card. Since few people had cash we were graciously allowed entrance without paying, enough to warm a Scotsman’s heart! 🙂 Dunure is beautifully situated with a pretty harbour and spectacular castle, home to the Kennedy clan.

From there we drove on to Maidens, passing the ‘electric brae’ and Culzean Castle on the way. The weather was continuing to improve as we moved along the coast, and at Maidens we had a lovely stroll to the end of the long pier.

Maidens village and harbour!

Lastly, we continued south west to the town of Girvan, passing on the way Turnberry lighthouse and Mr Trump’s famous golf course and hotel. The sun was now shining bright and the place was displayed in all it’s splendour, just as I remembered it as a child. Girvan has an amazing beach against the backdrop of the Byne Hill. Here the beach was again, …. very quiet!

After finishing the remains of our picnic, we had a lovely walk on the beach, then drove the 60 miles home, hugging the coastline for the first 21 miles, with spectacular views across the firth. It was a great way to finish the day as we celebrated 63 years since our engagement, and praised God for his faithfulness throughout the years!

Looking towards the isle of Arran from the Girvan to Ayr coastal route

I trust you are all keeping safe, and can find a quiet place to enjoy the beauties of God’s amazing creation. Matthew

Hurrah! The Picnic Season has started!

Well now that the busy period over Christmas and New Year has passed, we have the opportuniity to once again think of getting out of town. We love the outdoors! Glasgow is the perfect base for moving around as it has a great road and transport network, and is in close proximity to hills and mountains, seas and lochs, rivers and gardens.

Last week, spotting a break in the rather ‘driech’ weather, we prepared the sandwiches and flask, and at 12.15pm headed north towards Loch Lomond. We had no definite plan, but just intended to see if the weather would work out as the forecasters had suggested. It turned out to be the most perfect afternoon!

Leaving the little village of Arrochar at the top of Loch Long we proceeded to the top of the ‘Rest and be Thankful’ pass, where we turned left and headed down ‘Hell’s Glen’ on the steep single track road. We stopped to watch a sky diver floating in the blue sky amongst the snow capped peaks and enjoyed the beauty of God’s amazing creation. Right at the bottom of the hill we found a stranded motorist looking for someone with ‘jump leads’. Unfortunately we did not have any, and the driver did not belong to a motoring organisation, but after flagging down a few drivers we fortunately found someone who could help him.

The road led us on to Loch Fyne (once famous for its herring) and passing through Saint Catherine’s and Strachur we headed for the ferry terminal at Dunoon. We enjoyed endless photo opportunities along the way, and arrived at the terminal just in time to catch the ferry to Gourock, before heading home to Glasgow by 5.15pm. What a perfect day!

This week was so different, but also very enjoyable. We are only half and hour from the Ayrshire Coast, so with flask and sandwiches, we headed for our favourite reading spot at Irvine harbour. The tide was really high, the wind was howling and the sea was roaring, but the scene was spectacular! Just a few cars in the car park, so we were able to sit at the front and enjoy the spectacle.

I wonder, if like me, a song, a poem or hymn comes to mind when you are out walking or sightseeing? A hymn that I haven’t heard for years, but which we sang many times in our male voice choir came rushing back to mind. I wish I could still sing it 🙂 but the lyrics go like this:

Tho' the angry surges roll,                                                                                                               on my tempest riven soul,                                                                                                                   I am peaceful for I know,                                                                                                             loudly tho' the winds may blow,                                                                                                  I've an anchor safe and sure,                                                                                                     that shall evermore endure.                                                                                                    Chorus                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      And it holds, my anchor holds:
Blow your wildest, then, O gale,
   On my barque so small and frail;
By His grace I shall not fail,
              For my anchor holds, my anchor holds.                                                                                                                                                                                   -o-                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         NB. The anchor in the song, you may have guessed is Jesus!